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Nishad's notes

Meet up-and-coming singer K. K. Nishad...


WHEN K. K. NISHAD sings O Duniya Ke Rakhwaale, the loyal Rafi fan can rest assured of the quality of rendition.

He effectively tackles the challenge to present the song, one of the best-loved in Indian cinema, in a new way.

"My aim is to convey to the listener the emotional content of the song," he says.

Nishad, who hails from Kozhikode, the land of mehfils, is a well-known name among the music lovers of Thiruvananthapuram. Recipient of the Kairali-Swaralaya Jesudas award (2003), Nishad has also sung for films.

"The first offer came from Rajasenan (`Nakshatrakkannulla Rajakumaran, Avanundoru Rajakumari'). It was followed by `Swapnam Kondu Tulabharam'," says Nishad.

He is currently singing for two films, `Varum, Varunnu, Vannu' and `Pachchakkili Padu'.

Nishad has learnt Carnatic music from Chelannur Sukumaran, Shivan, Sreedharan Mundangad and Pala C. K. Ramachandran. Nalin Moolji has initiated the young singer into Hindustani.

A fan of A. R. Rahman and Baburaj, Nishad is unprejudiced in his love for what he calls "pure music".

K. J. Jesudas, Mehdi Hassan, S. P. Balasubramaniam, Hariharan, M. G. Sreekumar and G. Venugopal are among his favourite singers. "I like all good singers," he says.

A post-graduate in Mathematics, Nishad was working as a guest lecturer at the Devanagari St. Josephs College, Kozhikode, when the seven notes beckoned him. "I have no other plans," he says.

Every new singer in the industry nurtures the hope of becoming a music director. Nishad has no such dream. "Music direction is not my cup of tea. I cannot compose even a rhyme," he says.

His name is announced, Nishad steps onto the stage, closes his eyes, and his voice merges with the Naushad composition from `Kohinoor', Madhuban Mein Radhika Naache...

V.G.M.

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