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Appealing visual drama

Exoticism of form and colour characterise Anup Karar and Avijit Dutta's works on display at Kalakriti Art Gallery



Oil painting by Anup Karar

AFTER AN exhibition of contemporary Hyderabad artists, Kalakriti Art Gallery on Road No. 10, Banjara Hills, is now showcasing the recent works of Anup Karar and Avijit Dutta.

While Kolkata-based Karar graduated from the Indian College of Arts, Kolkata, Dutta did his Masters in Visual Arts from Rabindra Bharathi University, Jorasanko. The duo with a strong Bengali accent complies with the traditions set up by masters such as Bikas Bhattacharjee and Sanjay Bhattacharya.


Although the artists touch upon the urban and rural life in India, what meets the eye of the spectator is a very appealing visual drama that communicates in volume. The subjects have been immaculately handled in irresistible colours. One has to understand here that even the most ordinary object when defined as art, rises above the ordinary. And in this exhibition, this is what exactly happens. Anup Karar's large canvases enthral the eye by sheer exoticism of the painted subject, and its medium. His oil on canvas - portraying the colourful apparels and ambience conveys a gaiety not just to pedestrian activity but also to anything that is morose.

For instance, `City of Joy' or `Nowhere to Reach' denotes despondency. But the work appears like a page from the culture text. Many may respond to the aesthetics the artist imbibes in his work. And those who require a sure reference, would look at it as a Bengali environ, or one from Rajasthan. `Card Players' and `Pujarini' is equally arresting .

And once again, they all ride upon two factors: Of scale and naturalism that gradually dilutes when it comes to the eyes of the characters that Karar portrays.


Avijit Dutta rides the same wave. But there is a definite tone of his brush work. Besides his technical ability Dutta's conscious contemporary approach helps him balance the lyrical imaginative and the pop iconography.

In fact, his allowance for mixed media conveys his openness to ideas around him but in temperance. Another example is that of `My Colourful Window'. Here, he accommodates in his style the innocence of child art.

Realism is the basic grid that Dutta executes but eventually the lyricism of his brush and pigment takes over. Therefore, design does find a position as well. `Composition' illustrates his urge for photo-realism, which is later combined with Rajasthani puppets to balance the composition.

The common factor is the extreme earthiness infused by exoticism of form and colour that underlines this show.



Mixed media, Composition, Avijit Dutta

This display at Kalakriti Art Gallery is on until October 24, between 11 A.M. and 7 P.M.

AITYA AMJAD

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