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Wired to the charms

Game for some good luck charms?


IS IT schizophrenia? Or mandatory mantra? Passing fad, perhaps. Or is it exploitation of a weak mind? Whatever it is, the charm of the (good luck) charms is hard to be ignored.

"People are wedged in worries that they are forced to depend on these amulets. My friends have gifted good luck charms, but there is very little benefit," reveals Mira Sekhar of Mira's Exercise Studio. D. Poornachandra Rao, Feng Shui expert, says there are certain crystals, pyramids and precious metals which are known to transmit positive energy and work only when placed in the right spot.


A good luck charm is believed to cure fear, fight anger and restore balance in one's life. Be it the Laughing Buddha or bamboo shoots, it is the unflinching faith which keeps people latch on to these signs of good luck, Rao says.

But Dr. B.V. Pattabhiram, well-known psychologist, differs. "There is no miracle in them that they ward off one's troubles and pains. These amulets are nothing but self-motivating gadgets," he declares.

While Hema Rao doesn't leave her house without a picture of Shirdi Saibaba in her handbag, R. Kiranmayee believes in Ganesha (annihilator of obstacles), Om (a lucky sign of peace) and Swastika (bestows prosperity).

Renu, an interior designer, says: "Frankly, I'm not sure about the effects of the lucky charms. They appear pretty and add to the look of the house." It's just an individual belief." A view reiterated by B.K. Rastogi, NGRI scientist. "They look good as decorative pieces. Though I don't believe that they emit positive energy, there is no harm in keeping them." .

To eliminate negative energy, place crystal pyramids atop the house. For a healthy relationship, place a solid crystal ball in the living room, Rao says. But one should have willpower to overcome obstacles. Every individual has energy cycles and some underlying factors which should be tapped and harnessed, he observes. The amulets are known to protect people from diseases, physical injury, accidents and evil eye, says M. Ramana, a Reiki master. So, horseshoes, rabbit's feet, four-leaf clovers and bracelets have always enthralled people. The horseshoe manifests in wall hangings, jewellery and paperweights. "It wards off evil effects of Saturn," Ramana asserts. Nine emperors' coins are meant to enhance wealth. Wealth ball, hung in windows and doorways, lessens negative energy.


The flabby, bald Buddha with big ears is the universal favourite. "The Buddha is depicted as a happy person and he is known to take away a person's worries in the bag he carries," says Ramesh Goel, a section officer.

Wind chimes (b)ring in good health and wealth. A three-legged frog with the coin is a sign of wealth while bamboo plants are a sign of growth. If water fountain is for career upswing, dragon drives away evil eye. But Mira Sekhar argues: "Despite such a noise it made, Feng Shui is dying a slow death now."

Dr. Prabhakar Korada, psychologist, echoes her. "As a matter of fact, the rush for these items is the direct fallout of lack of self-belief and lack of contentment in people. We have sufficient means to tackle problems," he says. Sunil Agarwal, who sells Feng Shui amulets to a large clientele, says he sells a lot of them. "It's purely a business proposition in which personally I don't believe."n

G. ARUN KUMAR

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