Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Thursday, Oct 02, 2003

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus Delhi Published on Mondays & Thursdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Arriving shortly... Madhuri's man


THIS NEW name for comedy is serious about his prospects as a hero but still considers himself as a student of the art. The 5'3" simpleton from Shahjahanpur, who has grown in stature making two scene roles outstanding, is poignant about his first act as a solo opposite Antara Mali in "Main Madhuri Dixit Banna Chahti Hoon", releasing at cinema halls across Delhi this week. I have evolved in this industry by passing small tests. Now Ramuji has reposed faith in me to take the exam in `Main Madhuri Dixit Banna Chahti Hoon' and I hope that I will get first grade in this well," says Rajpal Yadav. "But `MMDBCH' is just a platform whose success or failure will decide the future course of my career," adds he.

Rajpal feels that the fact that he got to play negative role at the beginning of his career saved him from being typecast as a comedian. "The role in `Jungle' had many shades. Ramuji scripted the character, which was devilish, emotional as well as funny at the same time. People recognised my talent and I was not only nominated for the best villain award but also won the Screen Videocon Award although the main villain was Sushant Singh." It is credible considering the same year besides Sushant Singh, Suniel Shetty was also vying for the jury's support.

"After the award offers started pouring in. Though most of them were comical ones but between them there were films like `Chandni Bar', where I help sell Tabu in the flesh trade. Such roles give creative satisfaction, as somewhere I am still the theatre man, who wants to experiment and evolve every time he faces the audience. I still read plays at the highest pitch to keep the fire raging in the belly because art is such a profession that either you are everything or nothing. There are no middle grounds," shares the NSD product.

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2003, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu