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Easy on the eye

Sripathy Acharya enjoys the figurative idiom as his paintings and murals suggest


SRIPATHY ACHARYA enjoys the figurative idiom. The artist uses different mediums — oils, pastels and metal. Of these, oil pastels appear to be his forte, as is evident at a show of his paintings and murals at Lakshana Art Gallery.

Two works on Mahatma Gandhi, one a profile and the other where Gandhiji is seen with two companions, reveal Acharya's sensitive approach to the subject and the medium. While in the former, the wrinkles on the face effectively tell viewer about the age of the Mahatma, the latter has straight but broken lines moulding the forms. This, however, does not mar the mass of the forms.

The same sensitivity is visible in his portraits of Subramania Bharati, one alone and the other with his wife. The artist treats all these in a monochromatic scheme.

The work titled "Ravana" is contemporary in treatment. Again, it is dominated by lines, the demonic character indicated with subtlety. The "Kaliyamardana" depicts Krishna as a child in a slightly different pose. The swelling of the sea and the cloudy atmosphere are effectively represented.

Acharya has been able to create a happy mood with "Ganesha"; the friendly god appears as a cute boy, in a couple of paintings. "Awaiting" is almost like a line drawing where a crouching tiger is all set to attack its prey.


The paintings of Sripathi Acharya are easy on the eye as there is no ambiguity and they demand no interpretation.

His recent series titled "Meet my people" depict simple folk; the young man and woman dressed in colourful costumes and with happy smiles are perhaps newly married and are posing for a portrait. The works in this series and the series titled "Land is mine" reveal flat areas filled with bright hues but somehow do not compare favourably with his pastels. For instance, "Song of village" has too many rural images vying for attention. On the other hand "Divine music" has a splintered effect; the surface is broken by several black lines. The boy playing the flute and a parrot do not stand out at once. The piece looks like an attractive stained glass window. Acharya's textures are varied as far as his metal work goes. "Aditya" in mixed media of copper, brass and cork, with the Sun and a galloping horse, portrays the Sun's power and strength. The metal mural "Karpaka Vriksha" and a gold anodised image of "Baba", admittedly inspired by the saint who appears in the film, instantly catch your attention.

Sripathy Acharya's paintings, drawings and murals are on show at the Lakshana Art Gallery, Maharaja Surya Rao Road, near Venus Colony, Alwarpet, till September 20, 11 a.m.-7 p.m.

LAKSHMI VENKATRAMAN

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