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Indigenous compilation


IN `BHARATH' artist Sreemal Kumar Raj P.R displays a strong tendency to reduce each form to an incongruent geometrical shape; yet the cow, woman and farmer, the quintessence of the Indian dynamic, can be detected without any effort. Forms intermingle so that they appear broken in parts but this visual distortion is a ploy that the artist uses to bring about rhythm in otherwise motionless figures. The flat space allows him a greater freedom of expression and strong colours emphasise the complex design of interpenetrating planes. This work of art was amongst the many others mounted at Durbar Hall Gallery as part of the annual exhibition organised by Kerala Chitrakala Parishath.

Jayaraj Anakkara is a tribal himself who is dedicated to keep alive the rich tradition of his past. Here he is represented by a canvas of tribal dancers whose mind-boggling shapes are both attractive and alluring. What is exciting about the works is that they carry a raw look; the figures are reduced to a utilitarian, ritualistic shape and are drawn from some ancient belief depicting an evolutionary process. .

The upshot of young Dhanan Sekhar's obsession with the teachings of Vivekananda is his painting on the philosopher done in mixed media on hammer card. While the central figure is confined to the foreground, he balances his composition by creating a fallow space in the top right. Sekhar casts a web of purple cords and lines that breaks the monotony of the neutral, muted tones.


The collection comprises a few works in digital art. Says Jayshree Venugopalan, author of Joy of Colors, "The medium allows you to concentrate on the result and focus less on the treatment." The tri-panelled work reflects the carefree years of childhood as the young bask in the joie de vivre of life. The bright, unbridled colours accentuate this expression.

Byju Dev's, `The Lotus will not wait forever," is a remarkable portrayal of serenity. Siddhartha yet to become Buddha sits in austere and ascetic seriousness. The footsteps leading to the lotus pond suggest that this is the interim period in his life. Byju's bright colour scheme is significant as it highlights the calmness and the turmoil, advocating that nothing in life is static.

Nineteen artists displayed their works. They included Ayyanthole Sekar, Dharampal Korattiyil, Everest Raj, K.A.Francis, Govindan Kannapuram, Haneef Kumaranallur, Jeevanchi, Jinan Sekhar E, K.V.Jyothilala, KKR Vengara, KK Mallika, P Mohan, Ramesh Kottali, and Syam Mohan. The exhibition, which closed on Friday, was different as the works were available in prints, for those who could not afford the original.

SUNANDA KHANNA

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