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Truce with Hungama now...



TAKING COMEDY TO A NEW HEIGHT: Film director, Priyadarshan in New Delhi to promote his latest film, "Hungama". Photo: R.V. Moorthy.

HE IS driven by the desire to make films - films which his children would feel proud of. He has touched upon many sensitive subjects with the palette of his dreams. He has made 54 films so far.

In New Delhi to promote his latest directorial offering "Hungama", Priyadarshan explains it as a situational comedy that aims to tickle the funny bone of the child within you. "It is a light, breezy, comedy of errors that makes you laugh on account of its unexaggerated screenplay. It does not have the buffoonery that every Tom, Dick and Harry comes up with. It has some real plot-driven humour and no particular story," says this director and script-writer of the film that has Aftab Shivdasani, Akshaye Khanna, Rimi Sen, Paresh Rawal and Shakti Kapoor among others.

Riding on the crest of the success of "Hera Pheri", he intends to make a few more films of this type if market forces allow, but doesn't want to be stamped as a comedy king. "I have directed serious films like `Virasat', `Sazaa-e-Kalapani' and various other Malayalam, Tamil and English movies too. It's true that some of them were remakes or inspired from other films but I have written 36 scripts myself. `Hungama', however finds its inspiration in Charles Dickens's `Strange Gentleman'."

Many know that controversy followed him in "Laysa Laysa", his Malayalam venture and the ban that was imposed on him. Ask him about that and he tersely replies, "It is between the producers. I am not a party to it and the board has lifted the ban on screening of my films".

With the dark clouds not looming large and the sun shining in his life he now intends to make a film on female infanticide. "I want to make a short film on the subject say of an hour and 30 minute duration. I also wanted to make a film on the weavers of Kanchipuram but right now I am not planning for it."

But then there is a catch. With such South-centric subjects he is definitely not aiming for Bollywood. "I am comfortable in making films in all the languages that I have made so far. There is hardly a difference. It's just what the script demands. But sometimes films just don't click. `Yeh Tera Ghar Yeh Mera Ghar' was a satire. It required the people to think but people really don't like to think."

Whatever his plans, right now life is one surreal moment for him and he hopes to create one big deluge at the turnstiles with his "Hungama" albeit without any controversy.

And well, a "magnum opus" is what he desires to hit the silver screen with. But when, he himself does not know!

S.M. YASIR

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