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In the coolest job

With a stack comprising house to commercial pop, DJ Megha struck a chord with the music loving audience in the twin cities at the Teacher's Achievers' Night held at Bottles & Chimneys recently.



ROCKIN' ON: At Bottles & Chimney. --Photo: P.V.Sivakumar

HEADS TURNED as the MC announced the arrival of DJ Megha. A Miss India 2001 finalist Megha has walked the ramp for Hemant Trivedi, Ritu Beri, Rocky S and other leading designers. But she has taken to the console, "for the love of music. Music is energy. Disc jockeying is a creative thing. If you have a flair for music you can't keep it bottled up but need to vent it out. Though there is the `cool' tag attached to music there is a great deal involved to make the music work. It is a challenge every night to have people dancing to your tunes. You have to understand the audience and the kind of music they would want to hear," says Megha.

Thus from her favourite filtered house genre, Megha shifted to commercial pop— Enrique Iglesias and Kylie Minogue for the audience in the twin cities at the Teacher's Achiever's Night held at Bottles & Chimneys recently. For the show she lined up racy beats for the bartending act by Sandeep Verma, a suitable bagpipes piece for the Scottish dance followed by lilting pop tracks for the rest of the evening.

"Whenever possible I try to introduce new music to the audience apart from what is in vogue in that city," she says. A resident DJ in Mumbai at 1900s and now Mikanos, Megha has been disc jockeying since the past five years and she has played in Germany, Brazil, Switzerland, Dubai and other regions of the world. "It's amazing to find people ask you, `so you deejay and what else do you do'? Deejaying is a 9 to 7 job in itself and you feel even 48 hours would not be sufficient for the amount of work you do," she says. At one point of time she wanted to join Jamnalal Bajaj Institute for her management course but the call of music was greater. "My family has been very supportive all through," she reflects. With deejaying sought after as a coolest profession "more and more girls are stepping up. Many young girls who want to become disc jockeys do call me up. And I advice them that there is lots of work to do, practise mixing or make stacks. And having a professional DJ tag helps. I am sure in two-three years we will have a good breed of female DJs," she says.

S.F

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