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Numbers matter

There are lucky numbers and suicidal numbers. It all depends on the added value, says Sanjeevan Nehru, an engineer-turned-numerologist.


WHAT IS in a name? "Everything," says a numerologist from Tirupati. "Everything is in a name and it can be a boon or doom one's life," says Sanjeevan Nehru, the 55-year old numerologist, who was in the city recently.

"Numbers really mean much. There are lucky numbers and suicidal numbers. It all depends on the added value. Every alphabet carries a value— for instance, `A' has a value of one. Citing the example of Air India, he says it has a value of 16 which is unlucky. "That is why the carrier is struggling. Why, your own Chief Minister J Jayalalithaa spotted an unlucky number `4' in her name? It was only after she added an extra alphabet to it did she earn name and fame," opines Mr Nehru. In 1983, when on an official trip to West Germany, Nehru was inspired by a lecture given by Swami Ranganandha of R K Mission, Hyderabad.

"The Swamiji was giving a special lecture on the role of youth in India and was spreading the message of Swami Vivekananda. He said, that only when one learns to help the poor will he earn divine qualities.

His lectures created a sort of ripple in me. Then on, I decided to help the needy."

Soon, Mr Nehru resigned his DGM Post in BHEL and began working towards that objective.

"It was only by chance that Nehru ventured into numerology. Bedridden and bored in a Chennai hospital for over three months, he happened to read a book on numbers written by the world famous Cheiro.

"It was quite interesting. I started believing in his book. After long research, I tried working the numbers on my name."

"It changed my life. I tried it on my family and friends and on all those who carried destructive numbers in them. It did a lot of good."

He says that by modifying the values in the names of companies, he was able to revive sick industries.

And, Nehru opines India cannot make it big in the world arena unless its name is converted to Bharat.

"The value of the word India is 12, not a nice number." Nehru claims, he travelled to Delhi and spoke to ministers and convinced most of them about the need for the name change.

Ask him if it is possible and he replies in the affirmative.

RAYAN ROZARIO

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