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Shweta's sequenced Saajna


HER PHYSICAL attributes are as unconventional as her vocal ones. Dark, lissom and husky - Shweta Shetty may not be your conventional beauty but still she can make men parrot "Dil Tote Tote Ho Gaya".

Now back with her new album "Saajna", Shweta is upbeat about its prospects. She calls it "a labour of love", the love with her German husband Clemens Brandt and we know when love is in the air it shows in your work and it indeed reflects in "Saajna" as Shweta has tried to break her image of a singer, who sings just high pitched folk songs set to western beats in her trademark voice.

"In "Dhola re" the romantic lyrics are set to Indian tunes and for the first time I have experimented with my voice to prove that I am capable of much more. I have stretched myself to break my image and hopefully, people will take note of it," says Shweta, who gets a high when her fans call her by her pet name Shwet.

Trained in Carnatic music she is one of the pioneers of popular music in India together with Alisha and Sharon Prabhakar. She launched her first album "Johnny Joker" for MTV way back in 1988,with moderate success. She hit big time and incidentally got typecast as well, the moment her numbers "Mangta hai kya" for "Rangeela" and "Rukmani Rukmani" for "Roja" became chartbusters. What followed was a deluge of item numbers as "Pichchu Pade Hain" and "Ore Ore." "No doubt, my popularity soared with such songs but my creative instinct took a beating so I started refusing offers." In fact, she takes umbrage when one enquires, whether her forthcoming number in "Zameen" with Himesh Reshamiya, also falls under the item number category. "The song will stand out in terms of style and music and if that makes it an item number than I won't mind," she remarks.

On another pioneering effort - the war of flaunting belly buttons to gain popularity, Shweta feels that she has the figure to flaunt and is quite a few notches better than those girls in G-strings with bulging bellies crooning old hits. "My compositions are always original." Perhaps that's why Shweta ke "deewane to deewane hain."

ANUJ KUMAR

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