Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Monday, Mar 24, 2003

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus Chennai Published on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays & Thursdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Thiruvananthapuram    Visakhapatnam   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Fast food, the Malay way

It's a plateful for a small price. The fast food varieties offered by Pelita Nasi Kandar, the new Malaysian joint in T-Nagar, remind one of some Indian dishes.


WITH ALL that chrome, plastic and bright colours and lights, Pelita Nasi Kandar (phone: 55879222), the new Malaysian joint on the Sri Thiyagaraya Road, T-Nagar, is exactly what it claimed to be — a fast food restaurant. The ambience, menu, food and prices reflect it. Now all one needs to do is to keep that fact while enjoying the food.

There are a lot of things going for fast food and against it too. But no one can claim that it is representative of a country's cuisine.

What you get is the slam-bam style. The Ayam or mutton satay (Rs.35) is a case in point. It is passable, but the meat can be more tender. The famous peanut-palm sugar sauce too is tasty. But it is the price that will make you most happy.

The theme hardly varies with the rest of fare. Murtabak chicken (Rs.35) is the Malaysian version of stuffed paratha.

Served with a vegetable curry, it is clearly one of the most popular dishes on the menu. The vegetable curry, with its unmistakable coriander-red chilli-turmeric union, is a first cousin of our sambar.


Sotong or squid curry (Rs.30) may have been from any of our `military' hotels or the umpteen Chettinad joints. One won't know the difference.

Mee goreng (Rs.35), the spicy noodles with vegetables, holds no mystery. But again the portions are good and one can make a meal of a Mee goreng and a Satay. The rice deals too aren't bad. We went for the rice, small prawns, two vegetables and pappad. For Rs.45, we got a home-style meal. The chilli factor is bound to keep desi palates happy.

Now, a word of caution. Give the Malaysian energy drinks a wide berth. Our Red bull and 100 plus cans cost Rs.75 and Rs.60 respectively. While one is syrupy, the other is of an indeterminate taste. Unless you are bothered about the electrolytes and other vitamins you have lost, don't bother ordering one.

Desserts could have been better. The banana and apple toffee (Rs.42) is just plain fruits sliced and served with ice cream. Forget the toffee coating, there was not a drop of caramel syrup in sight. Ais Kacang (Rs.35) was also not exactly inspiring.

MARIEN MATHEW

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Thiruvananthapuram    Visakhapatnam   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2003, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu