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Using Cell Phones while driving

PRELIMINARY results of a University of Rhode Island study, which analysed the eye movements of drivers using cell phones, show that they have a reduced field of view— tunnel vision, which continues long after the conversation ends.

N Sivan

Podanur.

USING cell phones while driving is illegal. One can always use the hands-free mode. Police should also insist on the same and book offenders with the help of service providers.

N R Ravisankar

Kovaipudur.

CITY roads are narrow and vehicle population is always on the rise. A driver needs utmost concentration. Use of cell phones while driving will only lead to distraction and diversion.

Hence, drivers found violating the rules should be punished severely.

Capt. K. Vasudevan

Ramnagar.

BE it for fun or heroism, adventure or absolute necessity, it is to be borne in mind that all of us have a moral responsibility to ensure safety on the road while driving.

Strict action must be taken against those who endanger other's lives while trying to save time.

Sandhya Nagarajan

Thudiyalur.

A large percentage of accidents occur due to the use of cell phones while driving. Headphones are available but very few make use of them. Traffic authorities undertake frequent checks to bring to book those breaking this rule, but the problem continues.

H Lalitha.

THE Government should amend the Motor Vehicles Act to prevent the use of cell phones while driving. Spot fines must be levied.

Also, NGOs can provide free classes to educate motorists.

A Myilsami

Sulur.

TODAY'S cell phone users are careless. To regulate this, proper advertisements should be brought out on cell phone accessories and their use. Facilities like hands-free talk and one-touch dialling make life easier for cell phone users. It's a pity that many are still not aware of these things. This only goes on to show that the problem is not with the phone, but with those using it.

R Abhishek

Coimbatore Institute of Technology.

IT has become a fashion to use cell phones while driving. But, it may also prove costly.

What were we doing before the advent of these cell phones? Using cell phones while driving should be banned.

K Lalitha

Race Course.

TECHNOLOGY is a double-edged sword. The cell phone is a utility as well as a futility depending on the user's ingenuity. It is an accepted fact that using cell phones while driving can lead to disaster. Cell phone users must realise that it is not a gadget of luxury; it is merely a tool for communication.

Moreover, if the user receives any shocking news while driving, he might react badly and land himself in grave danger.

K Narayanasamy

PSG Industrial Institute, Peelamedu.

USING mobiles while driving has become a way of life. A survey points out that around 85 per cent cell phone subscribers regularly talk while driving and that nearly 10 per cent of the accidents are caused because of this.

K Rajesh

II BE Mech, Kumaraguru College of Technology.

THE sleek, handy, mobile version of the phone has come to stay.

Using mobile phone while driving is an indiscriminate act, as it distracts the driver's attention and ends up in accidents, minor and major. Many fail to realise this.

As a result, instead of reaching their intended destination, they manage to reach their `ultimate' destination.

K D Viswanaathan

Thadagam Road.

HAVE you ever heard of "cell leading to hell"? People think it is a feat to talk over the cell phone and navigate the vehicle simultaneously, but it only shows their lack of civic sense. They feel they are being transported, but to where... disaster?

K Pavitra Subramanyam

Class X, Kendriya Vidyalaya, Sowripalyam.

CELL phones are a good means of keeping in touch at all times, but highly dangerous if used while driving. Such use will lead to skewed concentration because the focus is on hearing.

K Mani

Advocate, Old Sungam.

MAN does not have to speak on the move in a bid to catch up with the fast-moving world. By doing so he is only risking his life.

I think the authorities concerned should impose strict laws to avoid cell phone usage while driving.

Most important, the public should be educated to park their vehicles and attend to calls, instead of risking life and public property.

Radhika Anand

TAUTA Nagar, Vadavalli.

IT would be better to switch off cell phones while driving lest you get tempted to talk or respond to calls.

Vimal Peter Damien

Final MBA, CIMT.

A famous lyricist has said "Unless a thief regrets, we can't stop him from stealing". So is the case with those using their mobile phones while driving.

The person concerned must realise it is dangerous. Mobile users in a hurry-burry violate traffic rules more often. Drivers! Put your family first, not cell phones.

S Gouthamen

I MSc, Bharathiar University

CONSTANT use of cell phones by breadwinners of the family might land them in trouble and bring misfortune and misery to their dependants.

G E M Manoharan

Vadavalli.

IT is a false notion that using cell phones while driving enhances one's image. It's quite difficult for the rider/driver to concentrate and this habit adds to the misery of the public. Strict laws are the only solution.

N Veerannan

Devanga HSS.

USING cell phones while driving exposes the driver to the dangers of permanently disrupting communication with his loved ones. Cell-talkers like the priest in the temple or a musician at a concert can be digested, but not somebody who is driving.

V S Krishnan

Vadavalli.

THIS is a middle class nuisance and a fine example of the misuse of modern scientific methods.

N Parthi

Avarampalayam.

TWO-wheeler riders beware. You may tend to lose balance while driving with one hand clutching your phone.

M Gautham

Class IX, Stanes HSS.

IF drinking and driving is an offence, using cell phones while at the wheel is more serious. In both cases, the attention and the reflexes of the driver are suspect.

Air Cmde M Vania

Sowripalayam.

ARE cell phone users so short of time that they find it hard to take a break from driving to talk for a few minutes? Their fortunes won't drain away in that time gap. The need of the hour is to educate and motivate road users, and if need be, create a law to curb this foolhardiness.

V Purushotham

Robertson Road.

IT is high time traffic police catch these offenders. They can erect signposts at various places in the city displaying messages like `Stop talking' and `No cell' to create an awareness about the dangers involved in speaking while driving.

Y V Visweswaran

Ramnagar.

HOW can one consider a mere phone call worthier than life? Applying some basic common sense, one can stop by the side of the road and talk.

Losing a couple of moments is certainly more sensible than losing a life or a limb.

Keerthi Manoj

Peelamedu.

USING the mobile phone while driving is a gigantic distraction. Business deals, friendly chats, knowing the cricket score... all require concentration. Such concentration is not possible while manoeuvring a vehicle in traffic.

Jyothi Victor

IOB Colony.

CELL phones should help us, not rule or kill us as it happened to two youngsters who met with a fatal accident on a ghat road when they were driving and speaking.

Even defence personnel are prohibited from saluting while driving as it might affect their concentration.

Two-wheeler riders keep their mobile phones between their left shoulder and ear, viewing the road with one eye's peripheral vision.

Dr. (Capt.) Prince Herbert

Dentist, Big Bazaar Street.

PEOPLE think they are saving time by doing two activities at a time.

But, only a few areas of the brain work simultaneously.

Driving uses the senses of vision and hearing while talking uses those of hearing and speech, so the brain is put through strain.

Dr. K S Ramakrishnan

Dept of Physiotherapy, KG Hospital.

USING cell phones while driving is no doubt dangerous in many ways. Who knows, you could be wanted at home immediately?

How to strike a balance then? Park the vehicle and then attend the call.

S. Ajay KrishnaClass VI,Liseiux MHSS.

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