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Netawear goes haute couture



One of the simple yet classy designs at Khaddar

THERE WAS a time when khadi was the signature fabric of every Indian politician. But today, the hand-spun fabric is the popular choice of many haute couture designers and those who love the "arty" look. And if you are fascinated by this very indigenous fabric, for whatever reasons, head for Khadder on Brigade Road.

The USP of Khadder is that it bases all its products purely on khadi. The parent company behind Khaddar, TC2PL, is the first company in India to do so. Says Rahul Upadhyay, the founder-director of the company: "We have transformed a dull, staid fabric to an exciting, vibrant product, which can be worn daily with pride."

The colours one finds on the shelves are vibrant, with most garments being available in bright hues of red, orange, yellow, green and so on. The products go beyond the regular khadi kurtas to encompass tiny spaghetti tops for women, wrap-around skirts, short and long kurtas for men and women, and daily-use shirts for men and women. One also clearly notices Khadder's attempt at producing khadi wear in European designs. A spaghetti top (priced at Rs. 299) on display, for instance, has Sanskrit inscriptions on it.

The clothes at Khaddar are both affordable and comfortable, especially the Ema (Bhutanese for chilli) Collection, that has Indian clothes in bright colours. The short and long kurtas for women (priced at Rs. 399 and Rs. 449, respectively) have different necklines, high collars, and round necks, with buttons down the front or on the side. There are also chudidars and dupattas, which you can mix and match with the kurtas. Other clothes for women are a variety of Westernwear, shirts and tops, with different styling.

While more than 85 per cent of clothes are for women, men can take a pick from short and long kurtas. The short kurtas are more like shirts to be left out, with different types of collars and sleeve lengths. Men can choose from chudidars and pyjamas in white.

Most clothes are available in various sizes — from small to extra large. The fabric is generally of two types, one slightly thinner and the other with a thicker, heavier feel.

Khadder will soon be introducing its next range, Silk Route, which showcases Indian and European designs in a blend of Khadi and silks such as tussar, matka, moonga, and noile. This range will have formalwear tops, trousers, tank tops, and spaghetti tops.

Khadder can be contacted on 4123359 or 4123253.

TINA GARG

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