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Life-like art

An art school drop-out uses an air-gun to create beautiful pieces of art on velvet that have a photo-feel to them.


IT'S HARD to believe that someone who dropped out of art school can come up with such pieces of beauty. `Srishti' Ramesh surprises you with his disclosure that he joined the Kumbakonam College of Art, only to leave it midway through to join a design firm. Looking back, he thinks it was a good decision. That stint introduced him to the air gun, a tool which he now uses to give life to his subjects. Experimenting with the gun, he slowly learnt how to wield it to get the desired effect. He now runs his own design studio and simultaneously works on his paintings.

Ramesh uses poster and acrylic colours and also enamel on a velvet base. The base is what lends sheen to the works, giving them a photo-like feel, the 24-year-old artist says. Also, since it is very soft, he gets the desired effect.

The disadvantage of this art form is that a mistake cannot be worked on. "Your aim has to be perfect, if not the painting is ruined and you have to start all over again. " The artist usually works on three pieces at a time to stave off boredom.

It takes two weeks to finish the paintings, he says. "The synchronisation of my fingers and thoughts has to be perfect. Else, it tells on the work." Ironically, the photo-like quality of his works has many doubting if they are indeed paintings.



GUNNING FOR ART: Srishti Ramesh and his take on terrorism. Photos : K.Ananthan.

"Recently, someone accused me of lifting the image from the Internet. I told him I would work in his presence to prove otherwise," he recalls.

Since the market for art is not very good in Coimbatore, he hardly gets private buyers. For now, he is working to improve the lobbies of a couple of hotels. His works have beautified the bar of the CAG Pride hotel in Gandhipuram and Anjalika Hotel in R. S Puram.

He has been getting offers from the cine field, but is now working hard on putting together an exhibition for the benefit of physically challenged children and is on the look-out for sponsors.

SUBHA J RAO

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