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Architect of his own career


A MAN can go places on the film firmament if he has the right contacts and possesses a degree from a renowned foreign institute of acting. For Ritesh Deshmukh, son of Maharashtra's Chief Minister, Vilas Rao Deshmukh, to do or not to do K. Vijaya Bhaskar's, "Tujhe Meri Kasam" wasn't an easy decision. After all, he is a qualified architect and a safer future beckoned. Although he refuses to admit that being the son of the most powerful man in Maharashtra helped, he is quick to point out that his one week stay on the sets of Subhash Ghai's "Yaadein" proved fruitful as not only he grasped a lot but cinematographer, Kabir Lal spotted him. That proved handy as Kabir was in "Tujhe Meri Kasam", which has been shot in Ramoji Film City, Bangalore and Malaysia.

At New Delhi's Taj Mahal Hotel, Ritesh is a picture of confidence and quite down to earth considering his political lineage. At 25, he has the perfect looks to go in for a bachelor boy in the film, in which Genelia, is acting opposite him. Isn't it an archetypal love story, one asks? Ritesh says, "Not at all. It is a simple story in which friendship between the hero and heroine has been highlighted. They are in the same college and are two inseparable friends. The film has comedy and emotional scenes too. Chinniprakash and Ahmed Khan have choreographed three songs."

Shouldn't he have starred in a film like "Refugee"? Says Ritesh, "This film wasn't designed to be my debut. In fact, I was the last actor to be finalised. I believe that an actor shouldn't be bigger than the film. I felt I could do justice to the role. It gave me an opportunity to portray a college going guy, who is the complete opposite of what I was during my varsity days."

Ritesh had joined New York's Lee Stratsburg theatre with the intention of learning the finer points of a new medium, which would help him as an architect. At the moment he has a foot in both the professions.

Ritesh wants to keep the dignity of the post his father but is not shying away from approaching directors like Karan Johar and Farhan Akhtar.

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