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An evolving artist


The basic theme in Sudip Ghose's second solo art show held recently at the Chitrangan Gallery in Hawamahal is a juxtaposition of several contrasting images of the human figure. The works seem inspired a fair bit by the inspiration the artist has drawn from his environs while he goes on to imbue his canvases with a self-admittedly introspective touch.

While it would be wrong to counter pose the aesthetic to either rationality or politics, one is often left wondering as to what motivates the artist. What is the wellspring, as it were, of the artistic desire and drive? In Ghose's case, there is certain fragility, much like the artist's real-life countenance, in some of his works. Several others seem angst-ridden underwritten by a boldness of ideas. What is clearly missing is any kind of ebullience, cheerful or otherwise - a quality one might associate with a young artist.

A product of the Andhra University Department of Fine Arts and the S.N. School of Fine Arts in the University of Hyderabad, Ghose worked earlier in a very small format. In the current series, the size has increased considerably and he is using material freely moving out of self-imposed constraints. He is now working in both big and small formats and has no hesitation in terms of colour application. The results are an impressive array of works by an artist who is evolving in both thematic and creative terms.

There are several typical threads in his works, the notable attributes being use of bright red and blue colours in almost all the paintings. Observations in daily life make up the subject matter in some of the works like `The Sweet Dish' in acrylic on canvas, depicting a beggar drinking out of an `empty' dish. In `Associates', Ghose has put on canvas implements he uses while at work like a basin and hairspray.

In `Extension of Desires', the semi-nudes of women, yearn to break out, but the white screen is forbidding, perhaps, conveying repressed sexuality? Interestingly, in these and several other works the artist does retakes of the works of masters like Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, David, Picasso and Dali in free-falling playing card miniatures. The `What's on' series done in acrylic on paper are also true to type with the use of bright red and blue colours.

V.S.KRISHNA

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