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Chords & Notes

TELUGU

Rendu Gundela Chappudu... Supreme...

Rs. 35

YET ANOTHER teenage love story, `Rendu Gundela Chappudu' has songs that are penned keeping in mind the tastes of today's generation.

Okasari modalaite by Unnikrishnan and Harini is a slow romantic melody about love.

Lavvu telu kuttindante ayyo papam anta is a foot-tapping number for youngsters. Kallalona kallu petti choodani nanu (which is likely to make you blush even if you are alone and listening to the song on your personal stereo) and Punarapi jananam (a sentimental and touching song on the secrets of life, death and emotions), both sung by S.P. Balasubrahmaniam, are good. One thing is quite striking about the album - it gave equal opportunity to many singers ranging from veterans, non-Telugus and upcoming ones like Gayatri and Harini.

HINDI

Suno Sasurjee... Tips...

Rs. 40.50

SUNO SASURJI has nothing new to boast about as far as its music goes.

But there are some feel-good aspects about the album: even if the lyrics are not pleasing enough, they don't take away the charm of the song altogether like in Tota mirchi khagaya; music on the whole is attractive though not quite original. Jab dil dhadakta hai and Aap kahan rehte hain aapke dil mein are predictable syrupy numbers.

On the flip side, Kardo kardo shaadi sasurji is good and may remind you of the title song in Govinda-starrer Dulhe Raja (remember Suno Sasurjee ab jidh chodo... Dulhan to jaayegi dulhe raja ke saath?) Others are just about okay.

SPIRITUAL

Mantra Shakti... Music Today... Rs. 65

IN TODAY'S n today's hectic world where people are constantly on the move and don't find time to sit in one place and do puja or chant mantras there are some short cuts. This cassette is one for instance.

It has about 22 mantras (some full, some abridged) chanted by Suresh Wadkar. One can learn to recite them by constantly listening to them or one can just listen to them for the sound that has a powerful impact on the mind. One need not turn pages of tomes to get to know these mantras. One can just switch on the album and go about doing one's work.

This compendium includes 22 mantras from the all-important Gayatri mantra and Shanti mantra to many more like maha mrutunjay mantraha, grahasamatti praapti mantraha, baala rakshaartha mantraha to vansha rakshaartha mantraha, deerghaayu prapti mantraha to many more

The mere sound of mantras is said to evoke powerful energy within the individual. The mantras featured in the album are printed on the flap for the listeners benefit. Perhaps an explanatory note at the end of each would have been beneficial. Some South Indians may find the pronunciation slightly different. But one need not worry about this.

This album is a good buy specially for those who want all the mantras in one cassette. Music Today must be complimented for releasing such music cassettes whereby today's Indian has a chance to be acquainted with the rich religious and spiritual legacy of the country. These cassettes help in a large way in combating today's stress and strains too.

CLASSICAL

Purbayan Chatterjee... Swar Alankar... Virgin... Rs. 75

VIRGIN RECORDS has been releasing a series of classical recordings under the Swar Alankar and Swar Shikhar series. These showcase the rich musical tradition of the country. Noted maestros and upcoming musicians feature in these albums.

Purbayan Chatterjee, son of Parthapratim Chatterjee, plays raga Nand replete with alaap, jod and gat. This is followed by a gat in raga bahar. This young musician has the necessary talent to go ahead in the musical circuit.

INSTRUMENTAL

The Confluence... Richard Clayderman & Rahul Sharma... Virgin... Rs. 75

THIS IS a unique confluence - not just of East and West but also of two instruments diverse as chalk is from cheese -the piano and santoor. The album features a maestro (Richard Clayderman) and a budding musician and composer (Rahul Sharma).

The sound of both the instruments blend so well that the music sounds like a cascade - flowing interspersed with ripples. The album includes basically abstract compositions composed by Rahul Sharma, son of santoor maestro Shiv Kumar Sharma barring three Hindi movie numbers. Rahul proves he is the chip of the old block. His composition abilities are certainly good - considering the musical lineage he hails from.

The compositions titled Together, Jaisalmer, Blues Heaven (Side A), Ecstasy, Norwegian Wood, Shangrila and Celebration (Side B) are fusion attempts - but the intonation is certainly Indian. The lilt flows gently and mesmerises you. And the tone is soft and subtle. The three Hindi movie songs played are Yeh hai Bambai Meri Jaan (C.I.D.), Tere Ghar Ke Samne (Asli Naqli) and Dekha Ek Khwab (Silsila, for which Shiv Kumar Sharma composed the music along with virtuoso Hari Prasad Chaurasia).

Both the artistes prove their mastery and dexterity over their respective instruments. The synchronisation is good and sounds melodious. This is an able and novel attempt worth checking out.

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