Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Monday, Sep 09, 2002

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus Hyderabad Published on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays & Thursdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Thiruvananthapuram    Visakhapatnam   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Appealing manifestations

Ganesha is an artists' and craftspersons' delight. Images of him are collected by many people as `objets d' art'. Check out the different types available in the twin cities.

GANESHA, THE most loved and popular God amongst all the Gods of the Hindu Pantheon is the first to be invoked on any auspicious occasion. What is amazing is his adaptability to the present day. There are no strict or rigid procedures of worship for him, and thus he is seen in most houses in some form or the other. There are many who take pride in collecting his icons in different forms and shapes.

The legendary elephant-headed Lord with a broken tusk and a mouse as his vahana has an unknown symbolism attached to his appearance. His huge body symbolises the entire cosmos or universe. The large size is indicative of the role he plays as one within whom the whole universe is contained. Ganesha is believed to be a very trustworthy Lord by all his devotees and is generous in showering his affection when worshipped by them. His huge belly signifies his ability to swallow all the miseries of the world whilst protecting all beings.

The mouse symbolises the petty desires of men which nibble away at their personalities and their inner selves.

There are 32 forms of Ganapathi, namely, Bala Ganapati, Shakti Ganapati, Nritya Ganapati, Siddhi Ganapati and so on.

For the day of the Ganapati puja, many households purchase his icons made in clay or papier-mache, painted in different colours. These icons are made in different sizes and poses and range from Rs. 10 to Rs. 50,000.

Today Ganeshas are made in an amazing range of materials. For home worship, a Ganapathi icon is made even out of simple turmeric and water. Ganesha has caught the fancy of craftsmen and artists who portray him in different ways and forms using different materials like terracotta, stone (different kinds like marble, soapstone, granite, sandstone to name a few besides semi-precious ones), wood (rosewood, sandalwood) metals (bronze, brass, copper) and so on.

The price range is vast- from Rs. 100 to Rs. 40,000. Most of these images constitute objets d' art and adorn homes. It has even become a fashion to collect Ganeshas and most households are full of them.

Ganesha icons are also available for this puja in gold, silver, pearl and marble. These are available at Kalanjali (Saifabad), Vishwakarma Art Gallery (Punjagutta), many antique shops in Secunderabad, Cottage Industries Emporium etc. Elite store in Banjara Hills has crystal Ganapatis for Rs. 1551, this puja.

Jagdamba Pearls have icons of the favourite Lord in pearl for prices ranging from Rs. 4,000.

The twin cities earlier witnessed the innovative effort of Ganesha forms in cheese the preceding year. For an avid collector, this time of the year would sure be a delight as one gets to see the most unique forms of the Lord, who is the beginning of all beginnings.

ARCHANA RAGHURAM

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Thiruvananthapuram    Visakhapatnam   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2002, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu