Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Monday, Sep 02, 2002

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus Kochi Published on Mondays & Thursdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Thiruvananthapuram    Visakhapatnam   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

A brush with nature

THE BOATMAN is a novice. At least, he has no business acumen. Replace that with innocence and magnanimity in large doses. As his boat winds its way down the river, he takes fistfuls of salt that he has collected from the sea and doles them out to the bystanders on the banks. No one is left out. Not even the grateful creatures in the water that jump out to get a glimpse of this humanitarian gesture, besides any little morsel that he is bound to apportion. At this rate he is doomed to a life of penury but in his generosity, the boatman throws caution to the winds.

As Sekar Ayyanthole, the author of this painting titled Agnihothri does to his sense of proportion. His character is a large able-bodied figure that occupies a sizeable part of the foreground. Compared to him the craft are far too small, the trees far too big. But these are minor issues for this Kerala based artist who revives and narrates the State's forgotten folklore like no other. The canvas like all others is filled to the brim. Even as the human figures dominate the space, the foliage and the fauna have not received any lesser treatment by the artist. They are imbued with their own unprocessed charm and have been stylised to the point of perfection. His works are a riot of colours, creatures and foliage so that at first glance his compositions look busy and unfathomable and the figures grotesque in their grandeur. What adds to the highly decorative nature that defines Sekar's works are the loops and squiggles of the dark lines. The artist says, once the paint is on, the brush makes its own path and he has absolutely no control over it. The doodle like effect comes from the immense speed with which he paints.

In the series, presented at the Durbar Hall Art Centre, Sekar's stories are stationed around the river Nila. Most of the large canvases on display have been shaped out in a sense of a larger canvas that he had exhibited a couple of years ago. They are loosely connected to each other as they relate to the characters, Vararuji, Parachi and their twelve children. No doubt his style and treatment is time-consuming. Sekar starts by applying a coat of rubber solution to the base. Later he gives it a light coat of acrylic colour. Thereafter he scrapes out the gum that has been left off the rubber solution giving the canvas a two dimensional effect. He fills in the line drawing with a thick paste of oil colours, crayons and pastels if need be, and scatters gold and silver dust in parts. Another interesting canvas, details a crowd of devotees praying to the Mother Goddess. Suddenly she assumes shape as she clings to the umbrellas held by the worshippers. "Actually she is not there. It is only her aura or force that is contained in the umbrella that the pious can feel and experience," explains the artist.

S. K

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Thiruvananthapuram    Visakhapatnam   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2002, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu