Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Monday, Jul 22, 2002

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus Hyderabad Published on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays & Thursdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Thiruvananthapuram    Visakhapatnam   

New dishes, new tastes

The `Dakshin' restaurant at ITC Kakatiya Sheraton Hotel and Towers features a revamped menu.


GRAVY GALORE: Puttagodugula battani masala (left) and Kadale gassi.

SOUTH INDIA'S myriad cultural and cuisine tradition is well known. Each of the four States has its distinctive culinary traditions and tastes.

In fact, there are regional variations within each State. The `Dakshin' restaurant at the ITC Kakatiya Sheraton Hotel and Towers has been offering guests a taste of the South through its menu.

Care has been taken to ensure authenticity of the flavours. Served in a thali on the banana leaf, the guests have a host of options to choose from.

As one savours the food (including the appams, dosas, uttapams and other things cooked right in front of the guest), one is also treated to some mellifluous music on the flute.

Periodically the menu at `Dakshin' is changed to incorporate new dishes.

"The new dishes have been introduced based on the feedback from our guests," says Chef Chalapathi Rao. At the same time, some old dishes are retained.


SWEET TREAT: Moongdal payasam.

Starting with Andhra Pradesh, the list of new additions include Kyema vada (patties of finely pounded mutton and spices), putta godugula battani masala (mushrooms and peas) natu kodi pulusu (a popular dish made from country chicken), mullaikada mamsam (mutton simmered in a gravy with drumsticks) veinchina mamsam (tender cubes of lamb cooked to perfection with brown onions, coriander, chillies and garam masala) and miriyala kodi fry (chicken fry).

The famous mirapakkai bajji (mirchi bajji) has made its entry too.

From Karnataka there is kadale gassi, meen rava fry (seasonal fish smeared with ground spices, coated with rava and deep fried) and kori gassi (a chicken curry - speciality of Mangalore).

As far as Kerala dishes are concerned, kai stew (vegetables cooked in coconut milk) and kai korma (veg korma) were the accompaniments for appam and idiappam for the vegetarians besides of course other non-veg dishes.

Now chicken stew (chicken and potatoes cooked in coconut milk) and vendakai mullakithathu (ladies finger in a gravy of tamarind, coconut, onion and tomatoes) have reinforced the menu from Kerala.

An egg curry (mutta curry) with a homely flavour from TamilNadu is the latest entrant on the menu card. There are two starters (prarambham) Madurai pakoda and yam vada.

For those with a sweet tooth moong dal payasam and pal kozhakattai can be checked out.

So go ahead and enjoy the old and new flavours.

Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Thiruvananthapuram    Visakhapatnam   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2002, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu