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Coaching people to be good managers

THERE'S little room for followers in today's fast-paced world. Whatever be your role, you are responsible for getting your part of the job done. And the way to achieve that goal is to be a good coach.

A manager can tell people what to do, when to do it, and how to do it but only a good coach can motivate them to give the job their full attention.

While others may point out the problems, a coach is there to help you solve them. He will motivate the individual to want to achieve the highest performance possible.

Here are some guidelines to help you be a better leader by coaching your employees:

Listen. Conduct an "inner-view." Get to know the person better. Ask about his/her family -- the high points and the low points in their lives. Find out how they coped with and survived the downs.

Ask insightful questions. Whenever your employees complete an assignment, ask them three things they felt were accomplished effectively in the project and find out which one area could be improved.

If they are on target with the area that needs improvement, praise them for the good work.

Don't avoid the negativities. An effective team leader will consider every member's input and ideas. Although it is easier sometimes to dismiss negative or contradictory feedback and comments, remember that the team members who strongly disagree with you can also provide solutions or some valuable insights from a different perspective.

Don't pretend to be perfect. It is important to realise that there are times you need to criticise and times to appreciate. Criticism need not always be negative.

Build rapport by relating similar issues you faced and talk about how you resolved them. Focus on the behaviour or action, not the individual. Reassure the employee that you do not think badly of him or her.

Build self-esteem. Coach about self-confidence. Recognise the employee's achievement and encourage people by telling them how valuable their work is.

Believe in what you do. Coaching is hard work and it is rarely given the importance it deserves. Yet, by being an exemplary coach, you can inspire your team to work wonders while giving individuals the sense of accomplishment they need.

PALLAVI JHA

Managing Director
Dale Carnegie Training India

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