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A few good laughs

SARAT CHANDRA

`A Nabghanara Ghara' was an entertaining play.



FAMILY DRAMA A scene from the play.

When acclaimed artistes come together, you can expect something remarkable. Ajit Das' directorial A Nabghanara Ghara ( "This is Nabaghana's Home") was much appreciated by the audiences. Apart from Ajit Das, the credit should be also given to Asim Basu, the veteran set designer, who created an impressive set for the play.

The theme of the play is simple: It revolves around three brothers. The eldest is a widower who has a young son. The second brother is religiously inclined and spends most of his time with a monk. The youngest brother, an amateur theatre actor, is keen on getting his eldest brother remarried for the sake of the nephew. One day, when the youngest brother urges his eldest brother to get married, which is of course turned down, a young woman who is being chased by a well-built man rushes into their house. The scenes that follow lend themselves to humorous interludes. The play undergoes a serious twist when the man in question enters with a knife in his hand and threatens to attack. But soon, his threats are thwarted and the play ends on a happy note.

The play was penned by Panchanan Patra (who passed away a few months ago). Ajit Das has been faithful to the script and his vast experience only enriched the presentation. The opening scenes, which show the youngest brother delivering mock punches to his brothers, prepare the audience for a comic play. The comedy of errors that followed when the young woman enters the house kept the audience in splits.

Ajit Das, who teaches theatre in Orissa and worked with Sangeet Mahavidyalaya in Bhubaneswar, is a versatile director. As expected, his play was entertaining and had thought provoking moments as well. For instance, the scene that shows an orphan boy's longing is commendable. Most of the characters were portrayed by Das's pupils, who showed promise and professionalism.

The play was presented as part of the annual fete of Pancham Veda, a theatre organisation.

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