Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Friday, Dec 16, 2005
Google



Entertainment Bangalore
Published on Fridays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Entertainment    Bangalore    Chennai and Tamil Nadu    Delhi    Hyderabad    Thiruvananthapuram   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Sharp as sunrays

Neena Gupta's performance in the role of a tormented queen was remarkable

After watching Shahaj Productions' Soorya Ki Antim Kiran Se Soorya Ki Pehli Kiran Tak, one can't decide which face shows more agony — that of King Okkak (Rajendra Gupta) who has to accept that the world knows he is impotent, or of Queen Sheelvati (Neena Gupta) who realises that a joy she has discovered is not hers forever.

The play, based on a 30-year-old story by Surendra Verma, is as relevant today.

The play opens with the royal assistants Mahattarika (Shamim Sheikh) and Paricharika ( Sunita chand) discussing their Queen's feelings as she prepares for Niyog. The ancient law dictates that a king, if impotent, must allow his wife to spend a night with another man of royal descent so that there may be an heir to the throne.

Director Rajendra Gupta, an alumnus of National School of Drama, had the audience sympathising with his character, the frustrated king. Flawless lines brought out the feelings of a man torn between duty and self.

Neena Gupta's portrayal of a dutiful wife pleading with her husband to understand how she feels about the barbaric law could not have been better. Her behaviour after her night out, as one intoxicated with love, was even more memorable.

The play touched upon several issues. Is motherhood the only proof of femininity? Is society right in prescribing marriage as a panacea for all ills including impotency?

With understated tones of sex, the play retained the gravity of the situation, rather than treat the theme of lawful adultery as titillation. Brought to Bangalore by CDL in the Theatre That Matters series, the play stood out for its superbly rendered dialogues, flawless cast, Vishnu Sharma's voice (as royal advisor Mahamatya). Simple set design and rich costumes gave the play its 6th Century regality.

M.K.

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail



Entertainment    Bangalore    Chennai and Tamil Nadu    Delhi    Hyderabad    Thiruvananthapuram   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | The Hindu Images | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2005, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu