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Action aplenty

`Aanai'
Genre Action
Director Selva
Cast Arjun, Vadivelu, Manoj K.Jeyan, Delhi Ganesh, Narasimha, Namitha, Sangavi, Kirti Chawla.
Storyline An ex-police officer rescues a collegegirl from a terrorist gang.
Bottomline Typical Arjun fare.

In Vasan Visual Ventures' "Aanai," Arjun lives up to his reputation as `Action King.' It has glamour, sentiment and of course action aplenty.

Director Selva has wrapped it all up quite well but it is in the second half that he loses his way letting some unwanted songs and fights hamper the flow.

The story starts in London where the head of a terrorist group orders his counterparts in other parts of the world to mobilise funds for the organisation by kidnapping the children of wealthy persons and extract money from them. How the hero Vijay (Arjun) gets involved with Priya (Babytaz) and rescues her from the terrorist group is the crux of the story.

Arjun as Vijay of course hogs the frames. As an ex-police officer he does justice to his work from the word `go.' He goes to the rescue of a college girl, blackmailed by another student, who photographs her with his mobile camera. Priya, a child, is kidnapped by the terrorist group and again Arjun, appointed bodyguard saves her. In the process he exposes the gang.

Arjun has done a neat job in this role that suits him. Ramya as Namitha whose love for Vijay is only one-sided, takes care of glamour. But she must watch her figure.

Keerthi Chawla as Sandhya has very little to do but looks as if she must learn the ropes of acting quickly.

The Tamil film industry has got a new young mother in Sangavi. New villain Narasimha draws attention. Vadivelu partially succeeds in his attempt at comedy.

K. S. Shiva's camera certainly enhances the proceedings of the film, particularly the London songs.

The music, particularly the re-recording by D. Iman, could have been more catchy. Of the nine songs, only a couple pass the average mark.

G. K. Gopi's dialogue is sharp and Selva has done a commendable job with screenplay and direction.

S. R. ASHOK KUMAR

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