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Where's logic?



Red Eye.

Red Eye

Genre: Action
Director: Wes Craven
Cast: Rachel McAdams,Cillian Murphy, Jayma Mays
Storyline: A maniacal killer aboard a flight goes in pursuit of a female copassenger.
Bottomline: Listless violence.

Director Wes Craven is better known for what are known as `slasher' horror movies — ``A Nightmare on Elm Street," ``Scream," 1, 2, 3 — where a masked guy with an axe chasing (and invariably catching ) sundry female victims , with bloody results, is somehow considered to be entertaining.

In ``Red Eye," he uncharacteristically keeps the ketchup quota under control and delivers a straightforward psycho thriller made all the more intense by being mostly staged in the claustrophobic inside of a passenger aircraft.

Lisa Reisert (Rachel McAdams), a Miami hotel executive, is flying home by an overnight ``Red Eye" flight and finds herself next to a seemingly nice man (Cillian Murphy). Nice he is not — even his name is Jackson Rippner (`Jack the Ripper,' see?) and he soon reveals that he is holding her father hostage and will kill him unless she changes the room allotted at her hotel to a top U.S. Government official — the easier to assassinate him.

Her attempts to warn her colleague at the front desk, Cynthia (Jayma Mays), without endangering her father (Brian Cox) land Lisa in escalating violent encounters, on board the plane and on the ground as the suave-but-psychopathic Rippner pursues her relentlessly.

This is a rather short film, less than 80 minutes, and features a cast of virtual unknowns; but it packs in a lot of suspense, some of it rather intense and most of it zipping along so fast, that one has no time to reflect on the illogical and bizarre plot.

ANAND PARTHASARATHY

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