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The treatment goes awry



WHERE THE HERO TALKS NON-STOP: Bambara Kannalae

Bambara Kannalae
Genre: Comedy
Director: Paarthi Bhaskar
Cast: Srikanth, Aarti
Agarwal, Vadivelu
Storyline: A young man from Chennai falls for a sophisticated girl in Ooty and his love goes unrequited till _
Bottomline: A light-hearted film which sags after a point.

You have to hand it to Srikanth. In every film the young man tries out a different genre and aims at making the best of the options offered to him. It is comedy he ventures into this time in Annamalai Films' `Bambara Kannalae' (U). But sadly a not-so-new storyline, an inept screenplay and dialogue that borders on the redundant, mar the attempt. The hero talks non-stop from the first scene till the last, whether he has somebody listening to him or not, and so do many others — the dialogue (Prasannakumar) touches an exasperating level. Aarumugam (Srikanth) is a hero in a Housing Board tenement in Chennai where he lives. All the neighbourhood girls, including the buxom Mena (Namita), drool over him. The young man and his colleagues are sent to Ooty on an assignment, where he sees Pooja (Aarti Agarwal) and falls in love with her. The damsel is in distress and Aarumugam gladly goes to her rescue. Once the crisis passes she just pays him some money for the `job' done and dismisses him. A crestfallen Aarumugam returns to Chennai, but Pooja follows him...

Acting quotient

Srikanth would have made a better impression in comedy if the other parameters had not played truant. For instance, some of his reactions in the name of levity seem overdone. When the screenplay sags badly and direction doesn't bother too much about redressing matters, the film as a whole suffers. Aarti Agarwal, who ought to have made her debut in Tamil with `Winner,' enters the scene with `Bambara ... ' and looks rather mature for a new face. Vadivelu appears in just one scene in the first half and in a couple of sequences in the second. Namita exudes sex appeal to entice the frontbenchers.

Sudden, unwarranted close-ups from Saravanan's camera hurt the eye. Vijayamurugan's natural re-creation of the Housing Board scenario and the artwork for the duet backdrops are noteworthy. The medley of old Tamil hits is an interesting aural experience. Otherwise Srikanth Deva has come out with fast paced scores so typical of him. Paarthi Bhaskar makes his entry as story and screenplay writer and director with `Bambara Kannalae' — only that he could have worked harder.

MALATHI RANGARAJAN

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