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Wide range of riveting themes

MANU REMAKANT

The Soorya Theatre Festival was a bonanza for theatre buffs in Thiruvananthapuram.



GRIPPING VISUALS: An unforgettable experience for theatre goers. PHOTO: S. GOPAKUMAR

The ongoing Soorya Theatre Festival provided some memorable moments for theatre buffs in Thiruvananthapuram. The plays covered a wide range of genres in theatre. The packed auditorium in Gorky Bhavan was moved to different scales of emotions.

Children's theatre

Edarikkode Kalasamithi's `Kunthappi Gulugulu' was performed by children from Malappuram. The performance of the young artistes was faultless. Contemporary elements were introduced into a children's story to make it spicy and humorous. The performances by Akhil and Mithunlal, who had received the best actors' prize some time back, were simply brilliant. Mithunlal enacted a leopard that was defeated by a clever farmer's wife. Deprived of all his glamour, the leopard, towards the end, is forced to do a `pulikali' during Onam to eke out a living.

The songs that accompanied the visuals and the actions on stage had a magical appeal. The play was directed by M. Parthsarathy and Arunlal.

The mood was different when Ravivarmakalanilayam, Annoor, staged their adaptation of Samuel Beckett's play, `Waiting for Godot.' The music reflected the tone and mood of the story. The theme of meaninglessness in life was narrated against an Indian background. The actors who performed the main characters of Didi and Gogo did a good job. But the narration was so complex that some viewers were struggling to comprehend the proceedings on stage.

Kaladharan took on the challenge of adapting the story `Oorubhangam' by Bhasa. The adaptation titled `Dhurabhangam' lasted an hour. The audience held their breath as Kaladharan mesmerised the audience as Duryodhana.

After his leg is broken by Bhima, Duryodhana repents. In that mood of self pity and introspection he realises that it was not war but peace that should have been the ultimate destination in life. `Crime,' `Mayaseetha,' `Porulmozhi Patom' were some of the other plays that were staged as part of the Soorya festival.

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