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Edge-of-the-seat action



UNLIKELY STORY: My Wife's Murder

My Wife's Murder

Genre: Psychologial thriller
Director: Jijy Philips
Cast: Anil Kapoor, Suchitra Krishnamoorthi, Nandana Sen
Storyline: A hardworking man in a frustrating marriage finds himself responsible for his wife's death
Bottomline: Thin story, great direction, Anil Kapoor even better.

Considering the rather unlikely story, "My Wife's Murder" is a brilliantly executed film. Ravi Patwardhan (Anil Kapoor) who's marriage is a nightmare, accidentally kills his wife, panics, and in a moment of inspiration, packs her in an Onida television box and throws her off a cliff. As if the evidence wasn't damning enough, he borrows a colleague's car to transport the box around. Then he tells everyone, including his children, that his wife has gone to Shirdi.

But it is not his actions that are unlikely. It is just that he doesn't get caught sooner. When the police trace the car, they don't immediately realise that it belongs to his assistant Reena (Nandana Sen). And even though he is a prime suspect, he makes an easy getaway.

Be that as it may, the director and Kapoor manage to make Ravi's implausible crisis your own. "My Wife's Murder" bears the trademark darkness of a Ram Gopal Varma Factory product.

There's tight, clever editing and some phenomenal acting. A better shrew than Suchitra Krishnamoorthy (who plays Sheila) is hard to imagine. Anil Kapoor's character is harassed, non-confrontational and later resourceful out of desperation, penitent and so, so afraid.

You get another bleak look at marriage when the comical inspector Tejpal is sitting at his table, trying to evade his wife's aggression. Boman Irani's presence as the inspector somehow lightens your trauma. The supporting cast also does a good job. This may not have fast cars and exploding bombs. But it's definitely edge-of-the-seat action.

SUSAN MUTHALALY

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