Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Friday, Aug 05, 2005
Google

Entertainment Thiruvananthapuram
Published on Fridays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Entertainment    Bangalore    Chennai and Tamil Nadu    Delhi    Hyderabad    Thiruvananthapuram   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Songs for the silver screen

G.S. PAUL

Music directors and film directors discussed the relevance of film songs and demonstrated how a song is created.

Photo: K.K. Najeeb

TUNING IN: Mohan Sithara demonstrates how a composer works.

A two-day workshop in Thrissur dwelt at length on film songs and their current status in Malayalam films. The workshop gave participants a glimpse into the creation of a song. Music directors Mohan Sithara, Vidyadharan and Mannur Rajakumaran Unni and film directors Sathyan Anthikkad and Ambili participated in the workshop.

`Applied music'

Branded as `applied music,' film songs are the most popular among the various branches of music. In the past, these songs were marked by a harmonious blending of score and lyrics. While underscoring the fact that a film is essentially the creation of its director, Sathyan Anthikkad pointed out: "It's necessary that the film director be conversant with at least the very purpose of songs in his film."

Sathyan who has to his credit the alluring lines, `Oru nimisham tharoo ninnilaliyaan,' deplored the present method of penning the lyrics for pre-determined music scores.

Taking a cue from Sathyan's observations, music director Vidyadharan said, "The director must be able to put convey his demands to the lyricist and the music director."

Vidyadharan explained that only lyrics with `matter and metre' could make excellent film songs. Only 35 per cent depended on the music while 65 per cent was determined by the lyrics. Discussing the much-talked about method of writing lyrics for ready-made scores, Vidyadharan averred that only seasoned poets and lyricists could succeed in such attempts. As an example, he cited O.N. V.'s lines in `Ezhuthappurangal,' (`Paaduvaanai vannu ninte pativaathukkal') that was rendered by K.J. Jesudas.

"It is true that electronics has revolutionised the studio; but the involvement that we had experienced in the past has totally disappeared and music production has been relegated to a mechanical process," rued Vidyadharan.

Mohan Sithara exhibited his dexterity by composing some impromptu music much to the delight of the 30 budding musicians and lyricists. Shoranur Karthikeyan lyrics, which were penned during the workshop, was set to tune by Mohan. `Innale raavil, neela nilaavil nee vannu' were the opening lines. As Mohan took it up for scoring the music, he scored off `nee,' explaining how it was counterproductive to the metre of the song.

He also demonstrated how the score has to be in conformity with the spirit of the lines. Composing the music for the lyrics, `Pirinju poy nee akale,' Mohan composed different scores for the same line; each one reflecting the duration of separation (`akale').

The workshop was organised by the Thrissur-based Trust for Social and Individual Growth and Harmony (SIGHT).

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Entertainment    Bangalore    Chennai and Tamil Nadu    Delhi    Hyderabad    Thiruvananthapuram   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | The Hindu Images | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2005, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu