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"Boogeyman"



"Boogeyman" tries to frighten you, in vain.

THIS COLUMBIA Tristar Films presentation, produced by Ghost House Pictures and directed by Stephen Kay, is a psychological horror that fails to thrill.

As disoriented as the hero traumatised by the boogeyman of his childhood days, the film often has him going through one door and walking out through another.

More than the boogeyman, it is the creaking door (how predictable can you get?), door handle on which the camera stays fixed (the hero keeps staring at it once too often) and the pounding score in the background that try to frighten you. But by the time the boogeyman finally surfaces to send a chill, you are too exasperated to even feel scared.

Boogeyman or bogeyman tales for bedtime, often told by his dad, frighten eight-year old Tim out of his wits. And after the creature actually sucks in his dad through a locked door he lives in perennial fear. Failing to restrict him to fantasy, Tim allows the boogeyman to take charge of his life and leave him a mental wreck.

Tim (Barry Watson) is now a young man with an understanding girl friend, Jessica (Tory Mussett). Haunted by fear of the boogeyman, he visits the psychiatrist's home after his mother's death — he has been going there for help since childhood. He is advised to spend just one night at the home of his parents. Why he complies is a puzzle! Anyway at the desolate place the psychologically beaten Tim is only treated to more eeriness, tragedy and high-strung action.

If music in "Boogeyman" is unnecessarily deafening, dialogue is unbelievably insipid. "Count five and your fear will go away," the hero advises a young girl. "What happens if I count six?" is her profound query!

Watching the flick in English is enough of a trying experience. You dread the proposition of viewing the cacophony in its desi versions! This "Boogeyman" is too boring.

MALATHI RANGARAJAN

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