Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Friday, Mar 11, 2005

About Us
Contact Us
Entertainment Bangalore
Published on Fridays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Entertainment    Bangalore    Chennai and Tamil Nadu    Delhi    Hyderabad    Thiruvananthapuram   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Recasting a myth



Aatikeyu Nanalla speaks about the exploitation of women.

AATIKEYU NANALLA, based on the theme of exploitation of women both in myths and modern times, was staged at Jaganmohan Palace, Mysore, by BSNL Working Women's Organisation.

The play is an adaptation of Madhavi's story from Mahabharatha. Madhavi, the charming daughter of King Yayathi, was given in marriage to sage Galava. He, in turn, gave her to Vishwamitra as guru dakshina. Madhavi was later gifted to several kings for Galava's selfish gains. Finally, Galava says he would marry her if she could revoke her virginity. Madhavi chooses to live a life of her own.

Ably guided by Hulugappa Kattimani, Geetha Patak did a praiseworthy job of direction. Even while it is pertinent to make the play contemporary and do away with timeworn details of the age-old story, it is also important not to distort the original, which could offend the sensibilities of traditionalists.

The songs had lovely tunes ("Naanu bhoomi neenu sharadi" and "Kanasina agasadalli teluva") and the costumes were captivating.

Sukruthi as the young Madhavi stole the show with her mature performance. Pooja (Galava), Geetha (old Madhavi), and Meera (Yayathi) were notable in their supporting roles. The play matched any professional performance but was more a play than a dance drama as announced. Nagamani and her team gave good music support.

The earlier performances of Bharathanatya (Sajana) and Kuchipudi (Apporva) at the same venue were impressive.

Kumari Approva's abhinaya, angasoustava and charis were perfect. The artiste's involvement while performing the taranga (the lone item presented by the Kuchipudi artiste) was restricted to recorded music and there was no scope for any creativity.

B.S.S. RAO

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Entertainment    Bangalore    Chennai and Tamil Nadu    Delhi    Hyderabad    Thiruvananthapuram   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | The Hindu Images | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2005, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu