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Sukran



"Sukran" ... typical masala fare from Chandrasekaran

PRODUCED BY JS Films and presented by Sri Surya Movies, "Sukran," (A) is more an image boosting exercise for Vijay — Project Vijay all the way from the halfway point. Even films that have had him as the sole hero cannot claim to have given such punch in the dialogue he utters. Yet young Ravikrishna also has a solid part to play from start to finish. Producer, writer and director S. A. Chandrasekaran returns after a hiatus, youthful in imagination and agile in execution — at times too much so.

Ravi (Ravikrishna) is a college student ardently in love with classmate Sandhya (Nateesha). Ravi's dad (Nasser) approves of the match but Sandhya's step mom doesn't. Problems arise and the lovebirds flee (as usual). Seeking refuge in Chennai, they end up losing everything. And that's when Sukran (Vijay) enters. Invincible and fearless he arrives to save the fledglings. The way Chennai is projected in films these days would make those living here shudder. You have clichés such as the evil politicians (Rajan P. Dev and `Fefsi' Vijayan), the latter's wastrel of a son, and the inhuman policeman (Sriman). The cantankerous lot filming every heinous act of theirs and getting caught because of the proofs they create only show them as complete fools! The molestation scenes lack finesse. The coarseness, as a whole, need not be commented upon because playing to the gallery is the aim.

"Sukran" is Ravikrishna's second release after "7/G Rainbow Colony." The best part about his character is that he has been allowed to be his natural self — no gimmicks, no unbelievable heroism — only naivety and helplessness. The young hero also shows some improvement in dance. In performance, he is not the raw entrant you saw in "7/G ... " Vijay looks more serious and glum than he normally does. The supposed-to-be new find, Nateesha (the regular filmgoer would remember her in a couple of other films) has been given scope to go beyond song and dance routines, and she passes muster in the heavy scenes. The affection that the father and son (Nasser and Ravikrishna) share has been captured quite well. But how a dad could allow his son to run away with his girlfriend, knowing very well the villainous nature of the opponents gunning for them, and how the son could leave the old man behind as a sitting duck, are matters the maker could have given thought to. The scene in which the director appears, just to add publicity for son Vijay, is contrived. The glorification gets exasperating after a point. Your son doesn't need such gimmicks Mr. Chandrasekaran! Just two scenes to make an impression, and M. S. Bhaskar (the policeman) achieves it with aplomb.

Jerks in the editing is what you presume, when you see a sudden shot of a confused face, which again emerges in hospital where Ravi is lying hurt and then vanishes! Suresh Urs is the editor. Vijay Antony makes his debut as composer — "Suppose ... " is a hum-worthy number. The concept of the song and its lyrics (Vijay Antony's again) are interesting. Jaguar Thangam's action choreography that makes the hero spiral in the air once too often doesn't worry about realism in stunts.

With successful son Vijay lending a hand, Chandrasekaran has a solid, selling spin-off on his hands. Blatant close-ups (that sometimes make you squirm), some crude characterisation, Rambha's glitz, Rahasiya's glam, Nateesha's oomph, romance and rape, all these with Chandrasekaran's yen for courtroom drama, make "Sukran" a cocktail of sorts.

MALATHI RANGARAJAN

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