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Aayudham



"Aayudham" ... with the formula intact.

FOR EONS now, a hero who is superhuman, a villain who is brutal and a heroine who is vulnerable are characters chiselled to suit formula ventures in cinema.

The same combo comes together to provide some masala fare in Mars Entertainment Group & Motion Pictures Partners International's "Aayudham." And it's all very fine if you are not looking for anything innovative in the entertainment offered.

Siva (Prashanth) is a medical college student who is easily irked by the atrocities around him.

And when he realises the torture that his classmate Maha (Sneha) and her family suffer at the hands of the evil Naga (Subburaj), who is obsessed with Maha, he has to do something to save them all and silence the bad man.

Prashanth is too experienced an actor to goof up the role. He plays Siva with ease. And as always he is more at home in action.

Sneha makes proper use of the couple of scenes that offer her a little scope to perform. But the beauty better watch her weight. If Mansur Ali Khan is a stereotype, so is Vadivelu.

Yet the comedian has to be commended for rising above the usual and making the character of the petty thief Thangapandi enjoyable.

Susan who takes care of the glamour is a surprise after the role she donned in "Neranja Manasu."

The first meeting between Siva and Maha and the subsequent scenes where each mistakes the other to be mute, are interesting. But strangely the heroine, till later, doesn't show much anxiety about the threat looming large over her family. And the villain, otherwise a heartless killer, waiting for Maha's permission to marry her (a la "Ghilli") is a joke!

The white girls in garish outfits, dancing in the background to resounding duets is downright ridiculous. Certain appreciable angles make Aravind's cinematography worthwhile and the graphics in the climax deserve mention.

Dhina's title music is noise galore and so is the re-recording. The dialogue that comes with the titles gets drowned in the din.

M. A. Murugesh, whose story, dialogue and direction "Aayudham" is, has played it safe sticking to the song, dance and stunt routine.

MALATHI RANGARAJAN

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