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Jai Soorya

IT IS action unlimited from Arjun who plays a dual role in Guru Films' "Jai Soorya" (U/A). But the hero's dynamism and stunts are not backed by a strong storyline or a taut screenplay — reasons for the sagging pace in the second half. With Manoj Kumar's story, screenplay and direction and Shankar Dayal's dialogue that sparkles in spurts "Jai Soorya" begins quite well and moves on with zest till the half way point. Trying to tie up too many loose ends up in a hurry is the reason for the pell-mell towards the end. The director seems desperate to show both Arjuns as heroes.

Soorya is a local henchman who would do anything for money and his accomplice is the enticing Laila (Baby). Their escapades together with Susai (Vadivelu) offer some enjoyable moments. The intelligent moves of the group throws a minister out of power and causes problems even in police circles. As usual even if he is a wrongdoer, the hero has his values, while the politicians and police are almost always bad. It's time our makers look out for villains elsewhere too. District Collector Jai Anand is the other Arjun — an upright bureaucrat who does not spare wrong doers. And when the two heroes come together it is a plethora of action amidst much confusion.

Arjun lends dignity to the role of an IAS officer and is more at home here than as a dada. Laila looks radiant. Her mischievous smile that reach her tiny eyes add to the lure. She doesn't have to emote much and that suits her (and us) fine. Chaya Singh is the other heroine, but has very little to do. Why she remains Jai Anand's fiancée for years on end is a mystery. Vadivelu's dialogue-based comedy works out well for him. From Kota Srinivasa Rao to `Mahanadhi' Shankar and from Rattan and Kazan Khan to Raj Kapoor and Ilavarasu the list of villains in "Jai Soorya" goes on. Karthick Raja's camera hurts the eye at certain points (the opening scene at the police station for one) but captures the streets of Kolkata and Chennai in a very natural manner. Action by `Power Fast' makes optimum use of Arjun's agility.

Arjun maintains his image of an enthusiastic action hero in "Jai Soorya" — but if the film still makes you restless towards the end, you cannot blame the hero.

MALATHI RANGARAJAN

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