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"Maha Nadigan"



"Maha Nadigan" ... in true Satyaraj style.

SARCASM HAS always been Satyaraj's forte. And he plays it up in marked style in Sundari Films' "Maha Nadigan." He makes fun of many in cinema and politics with his glib tongue, and gets away with it too. (He doesn't spare himself either) Story wise there's not much that is plausible and true to life, but the dialogue makes up for the flaws with its facile wit and genuine humour.

Satya's (Satyaraj) is a rags-to-riches story. He starts as a security guard in an apartment complex, and rises to become the C.M. of a State. And on his way up he has no qualms about crushing others' chances. But beneath the selfishness is a heart that is straight and honest. His status as a popular hero automatically draws him into the cantankerous world of politics and soon he is the Chief Minister. But well aware of his limitations he ensures that governance is placed in the right hands. It is a utopian solution that is projected — one that you can only yearn for.

Satyaraj's satirical one-liners and unique intonation are highlights. The hero knows that his strength lies in witty dialogue cheerfully uttered and uses it to the optimum. Earlier, director Shakti Chidambaram and Satyaraj came together for "Ennamma Kannu" that did very well. They are at it again in "Maha Nadigan." A much-slimmed down Mumtaz, and Nameetha take care of the oomph and glamour. Introducing Mumtaz in an Avvaiyar garb is taking things a bit too far. Bharatiraaja's son Manoj is impressive in a touching cameo. Mallika (`Autograph') provides the suspense angle but has very little to do. Which Chief Minister of a State can gallivant around town on his own at nights without security as Satya does, you wonder. However, Satyaraj holds the film on his shoulders in his inimitable manner quite successfully.

After "Ennamma Kannu" Shakti Chidambaram made the viewer take notice of his wit and comic sense again in "Charlie Chaplin." It was in the Parthiban starrer, "Kadhal Kirukkan," that he slipped. In "Maha Nadigan" the humour is back, though he could have concentrated a little more on the storyline too.

MALATHI RANGARAJAN

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