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Brother Bear



"Brother Bear" ... an enticing cast in a colourful ambience

"ONE THING always changes into another" is not just a statement that Denahi, one of the brothers of Kenai, the human who has been transformed into a bear, utters in Walt Disney Pictures' "Brother Bear." It is the crux of the latest cartoon flick that comes with a cute cast of cuddly animals.

Kenai, the youngest of three brothers is not at all happy with the totem — a symbol given to him by the Great Spirits to guide him through life. His totem is a bear, the symbol of love as Tanana, the village Shaman tells him. But when his brothers Sitka and Denahi have received a carved eagle and a wolf, why has he been dumped with the figure of a ghastly, evil creature like the bear, he rues. Only when circumstances change him into a bear does he learn to see things from other creatures' point of view. For the friendly, slothful and shaggy leviathans who wish to mind their business, it is man who is the intruding monster. The revelation brings about a radical change in Kenai's perspective and though he gets a chance to turn human again, he prefers to remain a bear and take care of Koda, the bear cub that's going around in search of its lost mother. Kenai's guilt knows no bounds when he realises that he was the one who had killed the mother bear when he was a human. The comic touches in action and dialogue that provide for some wholesome laughter also come from two absolutely foolish, guileless moose. Everything about the pair tickles you pink.

An original story set 10, 000 years ago at the end of ice age this legend-like tale would entertain kids and the old alike. And it has a thought-provoking message too — there could be another side to every issue that probably every one of us fails to see.

The animation with the Walt Disney stamp, directed by Aaron Blaise and Bob Walker, makes each animal adorable and the dialogue spoken with appealing voice modulation is enjoyable. The six songs composed by Academy Award winner, Phil Collins, add pep to the fun watch.

MALATHI RANGARAJAN

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