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Love Actually



"Love Actually"... charming depiction.

IT IS the perfect film for this weekend. If you believe in the Valentine's Day brouhaha and that love is what makes the world go around, that is. Actually when you come to think of it, it is not such a bad thing! At least it's better than hate and acting upon it.

Which is how the film begins. With the main protagonist telling the audiences that there is such a thing as love and that it is a lot more in the world than we care to believe. While this is a film made for Christmas and its spirit of joy, love and forgiveness, here as it releases now it coincides with Valentine's Day.

``Love Actually," is all around. The film seeks to celebrate love in its myriad forms. There is Daniel (Liam Neeson-``Gangs Of New York") who has just lost his wife and is unable to comprehend his 11-year-old stepson, Sam (Thomas Sangster). He believes he is moody because of his mother's death. But he discovers to his relief and surprise that it is because of the ``unbearable agony of being in love'' with a classmate who does not even know that he exists. And then there is the bachelor Prime Minister (Hugh Grant) who is attracted to a member of his staff Natalie (Martine McCutcheon) while his sister Karen (Emma Thompson) worries that she is losing her husband Harry (Alan Rickman) to an attractive but aggressive co worker, Mia (Heike Makatsch); and there is Sarah (Laura Linney) who is madly in love with the office hunk, Carl (Rodrigo Santoro) but does not have the guts to tell him.

Jamie (Colin Firth), a writer, goes to France to escape his collapsing marriage and falls for his Portuguese housekeeper.

To keep the humour alive, you have a fading rock idol played by Bill Nighy hoping for a comeback with a single, but makes no bones about the fact that he hates the song. And Kris Marshall plays a delivery boy who is fed up with the `snooty English girls' and is off to `a fantastic place called Wisconsin' to find the beauties.

For Richard Curtis who writes and directs this venture, this is his directorial debut after his successful penning of Nottinghill and ``Four Weddings And A Funeral."

Eventually however, nothing takes away from the fact that much as you would want to be cynical about this thing called love, you do succumb to its charm.

CHITRA MAHESH

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