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"Aaha ... Ethanai Azhagu"


YOU FEEL sorry for the heroine Sharmi. If she has a Machiavellian father in "Kadhal Kisu Kisu", she has an equally unreasonable and apathetic dad in Power Media's "Aaha... Ethanai Azhagu." Saran's associate Kanmani makes his debut as auteur with "Aaha ... " which has his story, screenplay and dialogue too.

Chandru (Mithun) and Divya (Sharmi) meet on the train and fall in love. But Chandru's avaricious brother Rajasekar (Nasser) has other plans.

Also Divya's arrogant and conceited father Natarajan (Pyramid Natarajan) is not going to brook any resistance from her.

The lovers try to run away from their families, when calamity strikes. Conveniently for the grownups, the young lovers now suffer from amnesia. Quite a few instances of hide and seek follow before it is time for the denouement.

This is Mithun's second film after "Gummalam". He does a fairly decent job, except in a few close-ups when he sports a wide and rather vacant grin. Sharmi shows apprehension and anxiety quite well.

Bhavna is Sandhya, who is madly in love with Chandru. Whoever designed those ghastly costumes for her, you wonder. They look more bizarre than the ones worn by models on the ramp.

To Karunas, shouting seems synonymous with comedy — the din is disconcerting, to say the least.

Composer Vidyasagar has not strained himself much for "Aaha ... " However the title score and the "Nilavilae ... " number are appealing.

There is hardly any visible time gap between Dhamu's Ooty visit (he goes there to get important details about Divya) and his return to Chennai!

Whether the lovers' forgetfulness includes everything such as their reading and writing skills, what happens to the hero's job at the computer firm and why the sole agenda of the elders is the marriage of their wards, without any consideration for the condition they are in, are issues that remain unanswered.

Little else can be said about a film that has neither major gaffes nor unforgettable highlights.

MALATHI RANGARAJAN

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