Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Friday, Jul 12, 2002

About Us
Contact Us
Entertainment Published on Fridays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Quest | Folio |

Entertainment

Raja


``Raja''— the execution could have been better.

FROM BLOODY action in "Red", Ajit switches over to romance in Serene Movie Makers' "Raja". The romantic hero image suits him fine, but he could have chosen an appealing platform to voice his pining blues. Ezhil is known for his decency in storyline and plausibility in direction. On these two fronts he does not disappoint much — it is the screenplay that seems wanting. The oh-so-lengthy flashback is a case in point. So is the elongated climax at the railway station, which tries your patience.

Raja (Ajit) is totally against getting married, but his parents (Radharavi and Jothi) refuse to give up. Priya (Jyotika) runs away from an avaricious father and a diabolical fiancé and seeks refuge with Raja. He realises very late that Priya loves him. When the hero turns down marriage with such adamance it is only too obvious that there is a woe-filled story behind it. There is. And it features a demure and meek college girl Priya (Priyanka). The names of the two girls are the same and hence a lot of confusion ensues.

The crude rape scene in the car transports you to the cinema scenario of the 1970s. Be it the violent college fisticuffs or the roadside fights, rape or murder itself, "Raja" allows no room for the police at any point of time! How long will a particular lingo be the butt of ridicule in the name of humour, you wonder (of course, the dialogue writer is Prasannakumar).

Sonu with his menacing eyes has all the makings of a consummate villain. Jyotika is at her ravishing best and her expressive eyes do the rest. It is a good break for Priyanka Trivedi who made a damp debut in "Rajjiyam". As the innocent Priya she does make an impression. Vadivelu's attempts at comedy fail miserably. Vaiyapuri is better in comparison. The dance sequences are colourful and the choreographers have done a neat job.

"Oru Pournami Nilavu" is a melody that lingers on your lips but otherwise the influence of old Hindi numbers is the recent trend in S.A. Rajkumar's music. "Raja"s recipe for success seems perfect — though the same cannot be said of the execution.

MALATHI RANGARAJAN

Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Entertainment

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright © 2002, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu