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dated September 6, 1952: Hyderabad incidents

The mulki agitation in Hyderabad which had taken a nasty turn was, to start with a local affair. A Government communiqué stated that the Warangal students who started it were provoked by "local individual grievances". But, as was usual in such cases, the mischief spread rapidly far beyond the area of its origin. In Warangal itself the students had decided to drop the agitation, following the Government's assurance that they would look into the grievances and tighten the issue of domicile certificates. It was felt that the manner in which the trouble developed, particularly in Hyderabad and Secunderabad, made it fairly clear that the flames were fanned by those subversive forces who were never slow to exploit any grievances, real or imaginary, and who found in immature students thoughtless and easily suggestible dupes. This paper's Editorial said that the burning of motor cars and police stations, the persistent stoning, the attempts to impose the will of the crowd on small isolated groups of the forces of law and order "all follow a recognisable pattern." Excerpts:

"It seems to us, however, that those who take the line that, though there were some excesses, the student-agitation was on the whole a spontaneous one inspired by anxiety for their future and was therefore justified, speak to a preconceived thesis and are not being helpful. A Congressman, who is also an ex-Minister, is reported to have said that "so long as the State was not disintegrated" the feeling that they belonged to Hyderabad and that they should be given "full opportunity and preference in Government and other service, was bound to remain." This is, to say the least, paradoxical. If this feeling and its rather violent manifestation are to be regarded as `justified' how can one expect that the sense of separateness and the insistence on mulki rights will vanish the moment the State is disintegrated into its various linguistic areas?... For many reasons, which have nothing to do with this question of mulki rights, many well-wishers of Hyderabad look upon the agitation for the disintegration of the State as singularly ill-conceived... So far as the mulki agitation is concerned, Hyderabad has been for long favouring the policy of giving special preference to the sons of the soil in Government service... The agitation against "foreigners", to the extent it is genuine, may stem from attempts to evade this rule.''

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