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Southern States - Andhra Pradesh

Kondapalli Seetharamaiah dead

By Our Special Correspondent

VIJAYAWADA APRIL 12. Veteran communist leader and founder of the People's War Group of Naxalites, Kondapalli Seetharamaiah, 87, died in his grand-daughter's house here today.

He was suffering from Parkinson's disease and heart problem. He had lost his memory power and had been spending a vegetative life for the last five years. His condition deteriorated so much in the last five months that he found it difficult to recognise even his kith and kin. The end came when he was being given a bath at 6.15 p.m. He is survived by his wife Koteswaramma and two grand-daughters. The cremation will be held tomorrow.

Born in a middle-class farmer's family in Jonnavada village, he was attracted to the Communist movement early in life. He became the secretary of Krishna district unit of the united Communist Party, which played a crucial role in Telangana Armed Struggle. Following a split in the Communist Party of India (CPI), he could not join either group and moved away from politics.

He went to Warangal to work as a Hindi teacher in Fatima School where he came in contact with K.G.Satyamurthi. Both of them were attracted to the CPI (ML) and attended the party conclave held at Gottikondabillam in Guntur district which was addressed by Charu Majumdar. He became a state committee member of the CPI (ML) and associated himself with the Srikakulam movement. He founded the People's War Group. He was arrested in the Secunderabad Conspiracy case. After killing the duty constable he escaped from the hospital where he was admitted for treatment in 1982 causing a sensation. He led the PWG for several years when it reigned terror in Andhra Pradesh and some neighbour states. Following differences with the leadership he left the PWG and came away to his native village where police picked him up in 1992.

The courts have acquitted him in all the cases filed against him by the police.

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