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Wednesday, Dec 19, 2001

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Entertainment - Music

Musical winds waft through

THERE IS a lot of music in the air, as usual, this season. And some of it is coming from tape recorders, and CD players. Cashing in on the theme of the month, a number of music companies and young artistes have released individual albums that have been welcomed by music lovers.

Incidentally, there is also a lot of fusion and cross cultural music that is being experimented with. Dreams Audio, a division of the larger conglomerate: Media Dreams, is on a fusion trip.

They have released several fusion albums, six, to be precise and what started with the `Masters of Music' sequence featuring Sivamani on the drums, Ganesh Kumaresh on the violin, Vikku Vinayakram on the ghatam and Selva Ganesh on the kanjeera, the firm has gone on to promote what it now calls `trans-global fusion music'.

`Dreams Journey, Vol 2', is their contribution this season. This album picks up where the first volume left off. Volume 1, according to Mr. J. Muthukumar, business head, Audio Division, Dreams Audio, was a runaway hit, with Kadri Gopalnath rendering popular songs such as `Kurai Ondrum Illai', `Alaipayuthe', `Janani Janani', `Ethanai Kodi Inbam' in his own style. The new volume, `Dreams Journey, Volume 2', is also by Kadri in the fusion mode containing this time, popular classical numbers: `Vathapi', `Radha Samedha Krishna', `Enna thavam seithen'.

Other albums from the Dreams Audio stable includes Rajesh Vaidhya's two contributions, `Temptation and Voyage', where he plays carnatic kritis set to western arrangements.

The violin duo: Lalitha and Nandini struck notes with Norwegian and Australian artists for `Revelation', while `Seven Steps to Liberty - Step one' by the troupe `Ahimsa' had yet another Indian-foreign collaboration.

One other release from an entirely different group, Bilva Music, a division of Bilvac Technomanagement, is once again in the popular mode.

For the connoisseurs of classical music, both Carnatic and Hindustani, here is the recent launch of `Winds of Peace' - a flute jugalbandi of sorts, featuring artist, K. Bhaskaran playing on two flutes.

Many say he has made a presence with his melodic lucidity, rich timbre and refreshing originality. Bhaskaran plays the flutes - one each in North and South Indian style.

Seeking a wider appeal is the album of pure Carnatic classical music with the North Indian equivalent of the Raga providing the right backdrop. The technique of multi-track recording has been used to achieve this effect, says Bhaskaran, who has been performing since the mid-seventies.

By Ramya Kannan and N. Ravi Kumar

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