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Tuesday, August 07, 2001

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dated August 7, 1951: Anniversary of Hiroshima Horror

In Hiroshima, Japan, on the 6th, six years after the first Atom Bomb had laid their home-land waste, the people observed the anniversary of that awesome horror by formally dedicating their city to the cause of ``eternal world peace.'' A bell in the uncompleted Peace Memorial Church began to toll at 8-15 a.m., the precise hour when, on August 6, 1945, the American B-29 bomber designated for the deadly task dropped the bomb which wiped out 70,000 dwellings and killed more than 100,000 of Hiroshima's citizens. With rapid and deadly progress taking place in the development of atomic weaponry, the Hiroshima destroyer had already become obsolete. A new Hiroshima was also being painstakingly rebuilt on the ashes of the old. The city's population was 130,000, and one hundred and fifty children who had miraculously survived the August 1945 attack were being maintained in five orphanages considered to be among the finest in all of Japan.

Churchill out of the loop

The British Labour Government Foreign Secretary, Mr. Herbet Morrison asserted at a meeting held in his South London constituency of Lewisham, that Conservative leader, Mr. Winston Churchill was ``in many ways absolutely out of date in regard to international affairs. He tends to live in a world which is no longer there...'' Mr. Morrison said he felt alarmed even to think of what terrible things would have happened to Britain and the world, ``if Mr. Churchill, supported by a hysterical band of back-benchers, had continued to be Prime Minister after 1945.''

Mobile post office

Jayanthi of Madras said, in a Letter to the Editor, ``The Mobile Post Office is a welcome innovation. But its benefits cannot be fully realised in our city of 70 post offices if the mobile office stops only near where the post offices are located. The MPO should be a boon to people living in remote parts where there are no post offices at all. To benefit people in the City, it should be scheduled to move regularly through as many such residential parts as possible from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. every day.''

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