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Film Review: Kannan Varuvaan


IF IMPERSONATION is as old as life, family feud that tends to get climactic at temple festivals, is as old as Tamil cinema itself. And when these two features form the basis for Lakshmi Movie Makers' ``Kannan Varuvaan'', naturally the film proves a damp squib.

Kannan's (Karthik) ambition in life is to take up the construction of the temple left incomplete by his forefathers. Funds are not forthcoming. Goundamani assures him that with his employer's help Kannan's dream could become a reality. But Goundamani is disappointed when his employer, the wealthy landlady's (Manorama) grandson Raghu (Ranjith) turns out to be money minded and heartless. In a fit of anger, Goundamani pushes him into the waters of a river and thinks he has committed a murder. Predictably Kannan is made to enter the scene as an impostor. What follows is a flurry of activity, dance, song and fight that fail to impress.

Divya Unni makes her debut in Tamil with ``Kannan Varuvaan''. She has very little to do. Of course she is hurt in the climax and life ends in a catastrophe. The dialogue as she is nearing her end, transports you to the typical Tamil film scenario of yesteryear. Mandhira makes a comeback but again it is a run-of- the-mill role.

The Sundar C., Karthik, Goundamani, combination had succeeded earlier. But here Karthik himself seems confused about his reactions. Goundamani in three roles evokes a titter or two.

The story and dialogue by Singapuli are too cliched to prove interesting. And Sundar C.'s screenplay and direction do not do much to elevate the film either.

Kazan Khan and Radha Ravi are the characteristic villains, who so typically, glare ominously, fight in a cowardly manner and eventually die as all good villains are expected to.

Sirpi's music, except ``Vennilavae'' to a certain extent, hardly affects the viewer.

Talented artistes, lovely locales, lush ambience.. only they have not been utilised well.

MALATHI RANGARAJAN

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