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Film Review: ''James Pandu''


TWO HEROES, Parthiban and Prabhu Deva, who have made a mark in comedy earlier, come together for the first time in Vishwas' ``James Pandu''. (It is not the English Bond but our very own desi Pandu).

Everything is in a light vein and hence the question of plausibility or logic does not arise at all. Parthiban's story has been scripted and directed by Chelva.

Certain scenes do evoke laughter like the scene in which the minor tiff between James and Pandu is told with much ado by Shivashankar, only to be scoffed at by the others.

The initial comic strains give way to some serious melodrama thus making the entire film a hotchpotch of emotions that is neither serious nor light.

Never would one come across such affluent porters at a railway station, like James (Prabhu Deva) or Pandu (Parthiban).

Prabhu Deva is a porter by profession and is ardently loved by Renu, a modern lass who goes around on a two-wheeler! Kousalya, who works at a refreshment stall in the railway station, is mute.

She is paired with Parthiban and tries her best to sparkle in a lacklustre role.

`Nizhalgal' Ravi runs a chit fund company and plans to cheat the public of their hard-earned money. He chalks out a plan and decides to take Prabhu Deva's help to succeed in his plan.

His manager (`Thalaivasal' Vijay) hatches another conspiracy to outwit his boss, with Parthiban's help. What follows is a series of incidents involving murder, police, fights and chases, presented in such a confusing manner that not much of it makes an impact.

Lack of a taut screenplay could be a major reason for the ennui that sets in, midway.

The background score has less of music and more of sound. The duets amidst the serious scenes are dispensable interludes that make the viewer restless.

A film that begins on an interesting note but soon dwindles into something different.

MALATHI RANGARAJAN

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Section  : Entertainment
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